• Reading

       Reading instruction at the primary level is conducted with a literature based textbook and phonics program. Comprehension, vocabulary, phonics, thinking skills and reading strategies are emphasized at all levels with the use of the basal reader, a collection of literature books, and a variety of enrichment materials. Instruction is systematic and explicit in the following five component areas (the five "Big Ideas" of reading): Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension. Independent reading of library books is encouraged daily. The Accelerated Reader computerized reading program is a strong component of the reading program.

       The reading program in grades four, five, and six is comprised of whole group and small group instruction. All pupils are given a reading placement test upon entering the reading program to determine each pupil's general reading level and individual needs. Reading instruction is conducted with a wide variety of multi-leveled, high interest materials.  Emphasis continues to be placed on systematic and explicit instruction in the five component areas. Direct instruction in the areas of comprehension strengthens the intermediate reading program. The reading of children's literature is continued in the intermediate grades. The literature component of the 4th, 5th, and 6th grade program utilizes the adopted literature text. The objectives of the program are to expose students to the environment of literature. Silent reading is encouraged daily to promote reading as a lifelong activity. The Accelerated Reader computerized reading program is a strong component of the reading program. 

    5 Components of Reading

    1. Phonemic Awareness & 2. Phonics will be rehearsed through spelling. Weekly lists will focus on specific sounds and patterns.

    3. Reading Fluency will be promoted through whole group, small group, and independent reading.  It will be assessed through weekly independent timed fluency practices.  Fluency passages will show words per minute, accuracy, retell, and comprehension. 

    4. Vocabulary Development will be achieved throughout the year using multiple strategies including an academic vocabulary, antonyms, synonyms, homonyms, root words, affixes, and discussion.

    5. Reading Comprehension Strategies will be emphasized through whole group, small group, and independent comprehension activities, discussions, and assignments. 

       To increase students' success in all 5 areas, I will use a variety of teaching methods to reach all learners - including The Daily 5  (The Daily CAFE by the 2 sisters), Reading CAFE Menu (The Daily CAFE by the 2 sisters), Comprehension Strategy Activities (Mary Legan Reading Ideas), Accelerated Reader, Lexia, graphic organizers, writing prompts, workbook pages, and other resources that I have been trained extensively in.
     

    Reading Academic Vocabulary Words include but are not limited to:

    Parts of a BookStory Elements  Genre
    cover
    spine
    title page
    copyright
    table of contents
    headings
    subheadings
    bold face type
    italics
    highlighted
    glossary
    index
    title, author, illustrator
    narrator & point of view
    setting
    characters
    protagonist & antagonist 
    conflict/problem
    main events
    climax 
    solution
    theme
    moral
    non-fiction:
    autobiography,
    biography, article,
    diary, journal, etc
     
    fiction:
    realistic, fantasy,
    humorous, thriller,
    mystery, parody,
    science, historical,
    fairytale, fable,
    play, poetry, etc
     
    Comprehension
     
    Vocabulary
     
    Figurative Language
    details
    main idea
    sequencing
    context clues
    inference
    drawing conclusions
    cause and effect
    fact and opinion
    problem and solution
    author's purpose
    character traits/motives
    affixes:
    prefixes
    suffixes
    Greek roots and stems
    Latin roots and stems 
    synonyms
    antonyms
    analogies 
    homonyms
    homophones
    rhyme, rhythm/beat
    repetition
    alliteration
    simile
    metaphor
    personification
    onomatopoeia
    hyperbole
    imagery
    symbolism
    tone 
     
    Accessing Information
     
     
    12 Power Words
    parts of a book
    dictionary
    thesaurus
    encyclopedia
    atlas
    almanac
    newspaper
    magazine
    phone book
    internet
    paraphrase main ideas
    with supporting details
     
    find textual evidence
    when provided with
    examples
     
    making inferences about
    texts and use textual
    evidence to support
    understanding 
    trace
    support
    analyze 
    explain
    compare 
    contrast
    infer
    summarize
    evaluate
    formulate
    describe
    predict
     

    At home you can help your child by...

    Rereading familiar books. Children need practice in reading comfortably and with expression using books they know.

    Building reading accuracy. As your child is reading aloud, point out words he missed and help him read words correctly. If you stop to focus on a word, have your child reread the whole sentence to be sure he understands the meaning.

    Building reading comprehension. Talk with your child about what she is reading. Ask about new words. Talk about what happened in a story. Ask about the characters, places, and events that took place. Ask what new information she has learned from the book. Encourage her to read on her own.

    Some information was provided by Moore Public Schools' website

    Other incentives 

     The student with the highest average = a medal, a certificate, and recognition at the end of the year awards assembly.

    The students with the 2nd and 3rd highest averages = a certificate and recognition at the end of the year awards assembly.