Daily Science Activity

  • Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 15

    Materials: Bowls, water, sugar, food coloring, spoons, glass

    Put 1/3 cup of water in 3 bowls.

    In the first bowl add 3 tablespoons of sugar. Mix until the sugar dissolves. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

    In the second bowl, add 1 1/2 tablespoons of sugar. Mix until the sugar dissolves. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

    In the third bowl, DO NOT add sugar. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

     

    Slowly pour the contents of the first bowl in the glass. 

    VERY slowly pour the contents of the second bowl in the glass. 

    What do you notice?

    What do you think will happen when we add the third bowl?

    VERY slowly pour the contents of the third bowl in the glass. 

    What do you notice? 

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 14 

    Materials: Bubbles (store bought solution), dish soap, body wash, water, bubble wand, bowls, spoons.

    Which kind of soap makes the biggest bubbles?

    In one bowl fill with 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon of dishsoap. Aggitate with spoon until you have foamy water. 

    Repeat in a different bowl with the body wash. 

    Go outside and use the bubble wand to blow bubbles using each solution. 

    What did you notice?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 13

    It's going to be rainy for the next few days. 

    If we can collect some of the rain, we could use it for other purposes.

    How would you collect the rain?

    In what ways could you use this water?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 12

    Materials: Sheet pan, Whole Milk, Food Coloring, Liquid Dish Soap

    Carefully pour the milk into the tray so that it just covers the bottom
    Add about 6-8 drops of different colored food coloring onto the milk in different spots
    Add about 5 drops of the liquid soap onto the drops of food coloring and watch the show!

    What do you notice?

    Why is this happening?
    To clean up, simply pour the colored milk down the drain. (don’t drink it!)

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 11

    Materials: Glass bowl, plate, or picture frame (clear glass), dry erase marker, water

    Draw a simple picture on the glass using the marker (stick figures are a good starting point).

    Pour water slowly into the container. 

    Gently swirl the water around. 

    What do you notice?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 8 

    Materials: None

    Last night a large thunderstorm came through our area. 

    Go outside and make some observations/noticings.

    Are some things broken, moved, wet, leaning, etc.?

    Why do you think these things happened?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 7

    Materials: Different sizes of paper, measuring tape

    Yesterday you experimented with building paper airplanes, and you problably found one design that worked better than the others. 

    Do you think the size of the paper will make a difference?

    Get 3 different sizes of paper and make airplanes using the same design. 

    Test them out and record your findings. 

    Which one worked the best?

    Why do you think so?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 6

    Materials: Paper, measuring tape

    Think back to when you have seen a planes fly. 

    What do you notice?

    Have you noticed that there are different styles of planes?

    Today we are going to make paper airplanes and test them. 

    You will need some paper. 

    Use the paper and create your first plane.

    Test it out and measure the results. 

    What did you notice?

    Now get another peice of paper and make a different model of plane.

    Repeat the flight and measure the distance.

    Was this better or worse than the first one?

    Try to make 3 planes and test them all to find the best prototype.

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 5

    Materials: Blades of grass

    Go outside and look at a blade of grass. 

    What do you notice?

    Why do you think blades of grass are shaped like this?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 4

    Today the temperature is going to be higher than normal. 

    Some animals need to find ways to keep cool. 

    Desgin and illustrate ways for different animals to keep cool in the heat. 

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for May 1

    Materials: Containers (different sizes), cookie sheets with rims (or large containers), water, salt, watercolors or food coloring (optional)

    Yesterday was part one of this activity. 

    Today you are going to need the ice you froze yesterday.

    Turn it out onto the cookie sheet. 

    Put a thin layer of salt over the top. 

    Watch and make observations. 

    After you start seeing some significant changes, drip watercolors (or food coloring - Be CAREFUL! IT STAINS!) over the top of your ice. 

    What do you notice?

    What to do think is happening?

    Repeat with the second block of ice. 

    Did this block react differently?

    Why or why not?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 30 (and May 1)

    Materials: Containers (different sizes), water, salt, food coloring (optional)

    Fill 2 -3 containers with the same amount of water and put into the freezer.

    Check every hour and keep a log of your observations. 

    What did you notice? Which container had the water freeze first?

    Why do you think it happened this way?

    Keep these in the freezer because we will do part 2 tomorrow!

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 29

    Cotton balls, paper, glue

    Last night we has some storms move through that brought rain and hail. After the rain left you could see some interesting clouds. 

    Use the cotton balls (pulling apart if you need to) to make the different kinds of clouds you have seen. 

    How many different types of clouds can you make?

    Why do you think they look different from each other?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 28 

    Materials: 2 Glasses, water, ice, spoon, salt, timer or clock

    Fill two glasses with the same amount of water. 

    Into ONE glass, put 3 teaspoons (1 tablespoon) of salt. 

    Stir until combined. 

    Now place ice cubes in both glasses - use the same amount of cubes in each glass. 

    Record the time. 

    Check on your ice every 15 minutes and record what you notice in your log.

    How long does it take the ice to completely melt?

    Does ice melt faster in salt water or fresh water?

    Why do you think this is important to know?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 27

    Materials: Household materials

    Pretend that you hurt your wrist. The doctor told you not to bend your wrist so it can heal. What are some things you can use in your house to help you keep your wrist from bending? Can you make something that would work? (You may need a partner to try this out.)

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 24 (From NSTA Daily Do)

    Materials: 

    • thermometer (meat thermometer, aquarium strip thermometer, temperature probe, etc.)
    • three containers (one container should be slightly larger than the other two)
    • hot and cold water (make sure the temperatures can be measured with the thermometer students are using - a meat thermometer or aquarium strip thermometer likely won't be able to record the temperature of ice cold water)

     

    1. Fill one container about half full with hot tap water, and then fill a second container with cold water.
    2. Measure and record the temperature of water in each container.
    3. Pour the hot water and cold water into the third container. Gently mix them together.
    4. Measure and record the temperature of the water in the third container.


    What do you think would happen if we repeated this investigation, but used hot water and cold water with different starting temperatures? Why do you say so?

     

    Repeat the investigation two more times, each time using hot and cold water with different starting temperatures than the previous investigation (be aware of the limits of the thermometers students are using). Students might want to try using hot and cold water with really big temperature differences, really small temperature differences, or temperatures that are both hot (really hot vs hot) or both cold (cold vs really cold).

     

    What patterns do you notice in our temperature data?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 23

    Materials: Clay, Container, Water

    Take a lump of modeling clay and shape it into a ball. 

    Put it into the water. 

    What do you notice? Record your observations. 

     

    How can you make clay float? 

    Change the shape of the clay and put it into the water. Record the results. 

    What kind of shape allowed the clay to float?

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 22

    Today is Earth Day! It is an international holiday to help make people aware of how their choices affect the environment. One part of Earth Day is recognizing The Three R's: Reduce, Reuse , Recycle

    Today we are going to focus on reusing items - and do some art!

    Find some items that were going to be thrown away (check with parents), and find a way to use these to make some art.

    Some ideas: Turn and old T-shirt into a tote bag. Take tissue paper and make a collage. Use cans to make tunnels for your hotwheels, etc. Yesterday we used foil. What can you make with this? 

    Find one way you can reuse something that was destined for the trash can!

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 21 

    Materials: Container, water, foil, pennies

    How does a boat float? 

    Today you are going to make a boat! 

    Use a 12" x 12" (or close) peice of foil. 

    Fold, crease, etc. your foil to make yourself a boat. 

    Float your boat in the container full of water and slowly add pennies one at a time. 

    How many will it hold before the boat sinks?

    How can you change your design to hold more pennies (without changing how much foil you use)?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 20

    Materials: Container, water, household objects

    Why do some objects float and some sink in water?

    Fill a container and gather a few household items (plastic toys, toy cars, etc.)

    WITH PARENT PERMISSION - Place one item in the water at a time and let it sit. What happens to it? 

    Record it on your observation log. 

    Repeat with your other items. 

    What did you notice? 

    Why do you think it's happening? 

     

    Lower Elemetary Science Activity for April 17 

    Materials: Celery, water, food coloring, glass jar (vase or tall glass will work too) (The results from this activity won't be fully seen for a full day.)

    Fill the jar about halfway with water. 

    Add food coloring. 

    Place a celery stalk (with leaves still attached) in the water. 

    Let it sit for a full day. 

    During the day, keep a chart of the time and write down what you notice. 

    What happens to the celery after it sits in the colored water for a full day? 

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 16

    Materials: Shallow dish (pie plate), water, pepper, small bowl, dish soap

    Fill the pie plate about 2/3 with water. 

    Put a small amount fo dish soap in the small bowl.

    Sprinkle pepper over the surface of the water. 

    What do you notice?

    Now put your finger in the center of the pie plate. 

    What do you notice? 

    Put a different finger in the dish soap.

    Now put it in the center of the pie plate. 

    What do you notice?

    Why do you think this is happening?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activiy for April 15 

    Materials: Measuring Spoons, Measuring cups, water

    Part of being a scientist is being precise and accurate when we measure.

    Using your measurement instruments and water, find the answers to these questions: 

    1. How many teaspoons in a tablespoon?

    2. How many teaspoons in 1/4 cup?

    3. How many tablespoons in 1/2 cup?

    4. How many tablespoons in 1 cup?

    5. How many teaspoons in 1 cup? 

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 14 

    Materials: None

    This morning we saw some snowflakes falling, but they seemed to disappear as soon as they touched the ground. 

    What do you think is happening?

    Why? 

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 13

    Materials: Paper, crayons

    Today is much colder and very windy. 

    Pretend you are an animal outside (Pick any animal you like.)

    If you were that animal, what kind of shelter would you build to help keep yourself warm? 

    What would it be made of? 

    Draw that shelter.

    Repeat with a different animal.

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 10

    Materials: Cardboard, toy car, household materials

    Yesterday we examined how a car (or ball) rolls down a hill. 

    Does the type of hill matter? 

    Use cardboard to make your ramp.

    Test the car on the cardboard. 

    Now, cover the cardboard with different materials that you have around the house (clothes, towels, foil, plastic wrap, etc.)

    What happens when the car travels on those different materials?

    Chart the differences you find. 

     

    Lower ElemeLntary Science Activity for April 9 

    Materials: Cardbook (or a big book) and a toy car (or a small ball)

    What happens when a car rolls down a hill? How far can it travel if you just let it roll? 

    Use your cardboard and a toy car to see how a car behaves going down a hill. 

    Hold your cardboard at an angle (Parents, you may need to help with this.)

    Does the length of your cardboard make a difference? 

    Does it matter if you let your car go at the top of the "hill" or in the middle? 

    Does the angle matter? 

    Make a chart to keep track of your results. (Parents, you may need to help with this.)

    If you have more than one type of toy car, do all the trials again. Does the type of car make a difference? 

     

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 8 

     

    Materials: Ice Cubes 

     

    Let's take it outside today!

    Put an ice cube on a hard surface in the sun. 

    At the same time put an ice cube on a hard surface in the shade. 

    Leave both for 5 minutes. 

    What do you notice?

    Repeat this 4 times throughout the day. (Record your times.) 

    Chart your results. 

    What do you notice? 

    Why do you think this is happening? 

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 7 

    Materials: A plastic cup

    Go out onto your porch, yard, or just outside your front/back door. 

    What do you hear? 

    Why are some sounds louder than others? 

    Are there any sounds that are repeating? 

    What do you think is making those sounds? 

     

    Now, put the plastic cup over your ear. 

    What sounds seem louder? Softer? 

    Why do you think this is happening?

     

     

    Lower Elementary Science Activity for April 6 

     

    Observe the sun, moon and stars over
    multiple days (in a journal with
    descriptions and drawings). Describe
    the differences in their appearance or
    location from day to day or week to
    week.

  • Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 15

    Materials: Bowls, water, sugar, food coloring, spoons, glass

    How can you put three different colors of water in the same glass WITHOUT mixing the colors?

    Put 1/3 cup of water in 3 bowls.

    In the first bowl add 3 tablespoons of sugar. Mix until the sugar dissolves. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

    In the second bowl, add 1 1/2 tablespoons of sugar. Mix until the sugar dissolves. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

    In the third bowl, DO NOT add sugar. Add a color of your choice and mix until all the water is that color. 

     

    Slowly pour the contents of the first bowl in the glass. 

    VERY slowly pour the contents of the second bowl in the glass. 

    What do you notice?

    What do you think will happen when we add the third bowl?

    VERY slowly pour the contents of the third bowl in the glass. 

    What do you notice? 

    Can you explain the outcome? 

    Would it work if you had more colors? 

    How would you do that? 

     

    Now repeat the experiment and change the concentration of water:sugar. What happens if you add more sugar? Less? 

     

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 14 

    Materials: Bubbles (store bought solution), dish soap, body wash, water, bubble wand, bowls, spoons.

    Which kind of soap makes the biggest bubbles?

    In one bowl fill with 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon of dishsoap. Aggitate with spoon until you have foamy water. 

    Repeat in a different bowl with the body wash. 

    Go outside and use the bubble wand to blow bubbles using each solution. 

    What did you notice?

    Empty the bowls and change the ratio of water to soap. 

    Repeat the experiment. 

    What were your observations?

    What conclusions can you draw?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 13

    In South Africa, there is a very serious shortage of water. 

    Water rationing is in effect. 

    Every person is allowed 50 liters of water per day (about 13 1/4 Gallons).

    This is all the water they get for cooking, drinking, dishes, showering, toilets, and laundry. 

    Spend today estimating how much water you use. 

    What would you have to do to live on 50 liters a day?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 12

    Materials: Sheet pans, Whole Milk, Low Fat Milk, Fat Free Milk, Food Coloring, Liquid Dish Soap

    Carefully pour the milk into the tray so that it just covers the bottom

    Have a pan for the whole milk, another for the low fat milk, and a third for the fat-free milk.

    (Option: Don't have 3 sheet trays? Do one at a time, record the results, clean the pan, and start with the next type of milk.)

    Add about 6-8 drops of different colored food coloring onto the milk in different spots

    Add about 5 drops of the liquid soap onto the drops of food coloring and watch the show!

    What do you notice?

    Why is this happening?

    Does one type of milk have significantly different results?

    Why do you think this happens?


    To clean up, simply pour the colored milk down the drain. (don’t drink it!)

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 11

    Materials: Balloon, 2 peices of tape (About 2 in.), a small needle or push pin (Adult permission!)

    Blow up the balloon. 

    Use the two peices of tape to make an "X" on your balloon.

    Carefully, push the needle through the middle of your "X". 

    What did you notice? 

    Try it with different kinds of tape (scotch, painters, duct, packaging tape, masking, electrical, etc.). What happens when the tape is different? 

    Why do you think this is happening?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 8 

    Materials: Paper of different thicknesses, measuring tape

    For a few days we have been working on airplanes. You have found your best design and yesterday you found the optimal-sized paper to use. 

    Does the thickness of the paper matter?

    Use your same design and paper that has the same dimensions (length and width).

    Make 3 airplanes with using paper with different thicknesses. 

    Test out your airplanes and record the results. 

    What were your observations?

    Can you draw any conclusions about planes from your experiments this week?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 7

    Materials: Different sizes of paper, measuring tape

    Yesterday you experimented with building paper airplanes, and you problably found one design that worked better than the others. 

    Do you think the size of the paper will make a difference?

    Get 3 different sizes of paper and make airplanes using the same design. 

    Test them out and record your findings. 

    Which one worked the best?

    Why do you think so?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 6

    Materials: Paper, measuring tape

     

    Have you noticed that there are different styles of planes?

    Today we are going to make paper airplanes and test them. 

    You will need some paper. 

    Use the paper and create your first plane.

    Test it out and measure the results. 

    What did you notice?

    Now get another peice of paper and make a different model of plane.

    Repeat the flight and measure the distance.

    Does it make a difference if the paper is a smaller or larger size? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 5

    Materials: penny, nickel, dime, quarter, eye dropper, water

    Rinse all the coins under tap water and dry them completely. 

    Place them all on a flat surface. 

    How many drops of water do you think we can put on the face of a penny? 

    Start adding water to the face of a penny one drop at a time. 

    Record how many drops you added before the water spilled over the sides.

    Was it what you expected?

    Using what we learned from the penny, predict how much water each of the other coins will hold. 

    How close were your predictions?

    Do the results surprise you?

    Why do you think water does this?

     

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 4

    Today the temperature is going to be higher than normal. 

    Is there part of your house that gets hotter than other parts when the temperature is high?

    Design a product that will help keep this part of your house cooler. 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for May 1

    Materials: Containers (different sizes), cookie sheets with rims (or large containers), water, salt, watercolors or food coloring (optional)

    Yesterday was part one of this activity. 

    Today you are going to need the ice you froze yesterday.

    Turn it out onto the cookie sheet. 

    Put a thin layer of salt over the top. 

    Watch and make observations. 

    After you start seeing some significant changes, drip watercolors (or food coloring - Be CAREFUL! IT STAINS!) over the top of your ice. 

    What do you notice?

    What to do think is happening?

    Repeat with the second block of ice. 

    Did this block react differently?

    Why or why not?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 30 (and May 1)

    Materials: Containers (different sizes), water, measuring cup, salt, food coloring (optional)

    Fill 2 -3 containers with the same amount of water (Be sure to measure the water!)and put into the freezer.

    Check every hour and keep a log of your observations. 

    What did you notice? Which container had the water freeze first?

    Why do you think it happened this way?

    Keep these in the freezer because we will do part 2 tomorrow!

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 29

    Materials: Household items, ruler, log book (paper)

    Last night we had storms that brought some hail to our area. There are many different sizes of hail. Sometimes we hear them referred to as "Tennis ball-size" "Baseball-size." Just how big are these things?

    Gather as many of the following items as you can:

    baseball, tennis ball, golf ball, softball, quarter, penny, grapefruit, ping pong ball, marble, nickel.

    Use your ruler to estimate the diameter of each one of these items.

    List them in your log book from smallest to largest.

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 28

    Materials: glass, water, ice, string(not thread), and kosher salt

    Fill the glass nearly to the top with water.

    Place an ice cube in the glass. 

    Lay the string across the ice cube and let it lay there for 30 seconds. 

    Gently lift the string. 

    What did you notice?

    Now try it again, but with one slight change. 

    When you lay the string across the ice cube, put kosher salt around and on the string. 

    Gently lift the string. 

    What did you notice? 

    Does the effect change depending on the amount of salt, length of time, or temperature of the water? Try changing one of these variables at a time and record the results. What did you notice? Why do you think that happens?

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 27

    Materials: Household materials

    Pretend that you hurt your wrist. The doctor told you not to bend your wrist so it can heal. What are some things you can use in your house to help you keep your wrist from bending? Can you make something that would work? It would need to be lightweigt, comfortable, and water-resistant. (You may need a partner to try this out.)

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 24 (From NSTA Daily Do)

    Materials: 

    • thermometer (meat thermometer, aquarium strip thermometer, temperature probe, etc.)
    • three containers (one container should be slightly larger than the other two)
    • hot and cold water (make sure the temperatures can be measured with the thermometer students are using - a meat thermometer or aquarium strip thermometer likely won't be able to record the temperature of ice cold water)

     

    1. Fill one container about half full with hot tap water, and then fill a second container with cold water. 
    2. Measure and record the temperature of water in each container.
    3. Pour the hot water and cold water into the third container. Gently mix them together.
    4. Measure and record the temperature of the water in the third container.

     

    What do you think would happen if we repeated this investigation, but used hot water and cold water with different starting temperatures? Why do you say so?

     

    Repeat the investigation two more times, each time using hot and cold water with different starting temperatures than the previous investigation (be aware of the limits of the thermometers students are using). Students might want to try using hot and cold water with really big temperature differences, really small temperature differences, or temperatures that are both hot (really hot vs hot) or both cold (cold vs really cold). 

     

    (With parent supervision): What would happen if we combine boiling water and ice? 

     

    What patterns do you notice in our temperature data?

     

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 23

    Materials: Clay, Container, Water

    Take a lump of modeling clay and shape it into a ball. 

    Put it into the water. 

    What do you notice? Record your observations. 

     

    How can you make clay float? 

    Change the shape of the clay and put it into the water. Record the results. 

    What kind of shape allowed the clay to float?

    (This experiment will be contintued tomorrow...)

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 22

    Today is Earth Day! It is an international holiday to help make people aware of how their choices affect the environment. One part of Earth Day is recognizing The Three R's: Reduce, Reuse , Recycle

    Today we are going to focus on reusing items - and do some art!

    Find some items that were going to be thrown away (check with parents), and find a way to use these to make some art.

    Some ideas: Turn and old T-shirt into a tote bag. Take tissue paper and make a collage. Use cans to make tunnels for your hotwheels, etc. In the past two days we have used eggs and oranges. What other uses could these have instead of throwing them in the garbage? 

    Find one way you can reuse something that was destined for the trash can!

     

    Upper Elementary Daily Science Activity for April 21

    Materials: Container (preferably clear), water, an orange (or two)

    Yesterday we examined how we can make something buoyant by changing the water. How else can we make somethign buoyant? 

    Fill the container 2/3 with water. 

    Put in the orange. 

    What do you notice? 

    Record your observations. 

    Now, take the same orange and peel it. 

    Put it back in the water. 

    What do you notice? 

    Record your observations. 

    Is it what you expected to happen?

    What could explain the outcome?

    Upper Elementary Daily Science Activity for April 20 

    Materials: 2 glasses, 2 eggs, water, salt

    How can you make something float that doesn't normally float?

    Fill a glass 2/3 with water and carefully place an egg in it. 

    What do you notice?

    Record you observations. 

    With the other glass fill it with 2/3 water but add 1 teaspoon of salt. Stir well. 

    Add the egg. 

    What do you notice? 

    Repeat adding another teaspoon of salt at a time. 

    Record your findings. 

    What happened? Why do you think it happened? 

    (You can use the eggs for cooking afterwards. Just put them back in the fridge.) 

     

    Upper Elementary Daily Science Activity for April 17

    Materials: Celery, water, food coloring, glass jar (vase or tall glass will work too) (The results from this activity won't be fully seen for a full day.)

    Fill the jar about halfway with water. 

    Add food coloring. 

    Place a celery stalk (with leaves still attached) in the water. 

    Let it sit for a full day. 

    During the day, check it every hour. Keep a chart of the time and write down your observations. 

    What happens to the celery after it sits in the colored water for a full day? 

    How can you explain the results? 

    What would happen if you leave the celery in the water longer?

    What changes would happen if the water and celery were left in the fridge for the entire experiment?

    Do you think the celery is still edible? 

    Would another vegetable get the same results? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 16

    Materials: Shallow dish (pie plate), water, pepper, small bowl, dish soap

    Fill the pie plate about 2/3 with water. 

    Put a small amount fo dish soap in the small bowl.

    Sprinkle pepper over the surface of the water. 

    What do you notice?

    Why do you think this is happening?

    Now put your finger in the center of the pie plate. 

    What do you notice? 

    Put a different finger in the dish soap.

    Now put it in the center of the pie plate. 

    What do you notice?

    What do you think this activity is modeling?

     

    Why do you think this is happening?

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 15

    Materials:Household items

    Oklahoma is known for being windy. 

    How can we measure the speed of the wind? 

    Can you make something with household items that will help tell you the wind speed? 

    Can you make something with household items that will tell you the wind direction?

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 14 

    Materials: Household items

    How can we measure the amount of rain/snow falling? 

    Design at least 2 ways to measure and then collect the rain for a period of time (usually 1 - 3 hours). 

    How much rain fell? 

    Did both of your designs reflect the same amount? 

    Why or why not?

    Which one is more accurate? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 13

    Materials: Pencil, colored pencils (or crayons) and paper. 

    Today is much colder and windy. 

    We've been working with cars, speed, and friction. What about wind? How does that effect the performance of your car?

    Deisgn a car that you think would perform best in a windy environment. 

    Make 2 or 3 versions if possible. 

    Why do you think your version is the best? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 10

    Materials: Cardboard, toy car, timer, ruler, household materials

    Yesterday we examined the idea of speed and how changing the angle of the ramp changes the speed. 

    Does the material of the ramp make a difference? (Think about a car going down a dirt road vs. a paved one.)

    Cover your ramp with various household materials (towels, shirt, plastic wrap, foil, etc.) and repeat yesterday's activity. 

    What do you notice? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 9

    Materials: cardboard (or large book) and a toy car (or small ball), Timer, ruler (or measuring tape) 

    We know what happens with something rolls down a hill, but have you ever wondered how fast it was going? 

    We are going to find out today! We are going to find an average speed of your toy car. 

    First, use your cardboard to make a ramp. 

    Start the car at the top. When you let the car go, start the timer. (A second person may be helpful here.)

    Let the car go until it comes to a stop on it's own. Stop the timer when the car stops. (Hitting a wall doesn't count. Redo.)

    Once it comes to a stop measure the distance the car traveled from the release point to the resting point. 

    Now, time for the math. Speed is just a division problem. You are going to take your distance and divide it by your time. (Ex. My car traveled 10 feet. It took 5 seconds. 10/5 = 2 so my car traveled 2 feet per second.)

    Now change the angle of the ramp. Does the speed change? 

    Try it will several different angles. Chart your results. 

    What can you conclude?  

     

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 8

    Materials: Ice Cubes,M Household Materials

    Put an ice cube on a hard surface in the sun. 

    Observe what happens. 

    Record your findings. 

    Using household materials (Ex. foil, plastic lids, metal lids, cardboard, etc.), design  a cover to create shade for the ice. 

    Try it with multiple materials. 

    What did you notice? Record your results. 

    What material worked best to keep the ice from melting?

    Why do you think that material worked the best?

    Is there a material that you don't have that you think would work better?

    Why? 

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 7 

    Go out side and observe some grass. 

    What do you notice?

    Why do you think some is green and some isn't?

    Do you notice a pattern? Some areas mostly green while some are mostly brown?

    What do you think is causing that pattern? 

     

     

    Upper Elementary Science Activity for April 6

     

    Observe the sun, moon and stars over
    multiple days (in a journal with
    descriptions and drawings). Describe
    the differences in their appearance or
    location from day to day or week to
    week. 

    What part of the lunar cycle are we in right now? 

    Why does the moon look bigger/smaller as the night passes? 

    Why do you see different amounts of stars when you are in different locations? 

    How would you describe our night sky to someone who has never seen it?